10 Secrets to Look Younger

Reader’s Digest recently posted an article about the 10 of the best secrets to look younger. This list contains some of beauty tips as well as healthy eating and grooming. Find out more from what you have thought it was.
1. Smile, wide!
Young, middle-aged, and older individuals studied thousands of photographs and were asked to guess the age of models with various facial expressions. Neutral expressions yielded the most accurate results, and fearful expressions made subjects look older; happy faces were rated as younger than they really were.
2. Eat more grapes.
Sorbitol, which gives grapes, berries, plums and pears their sweetness, is a humectant, a substance that attracts water when applied to the skin, helping it absorb and retain moisture.
3. Touch up your hair.
Use volumizing styling products as your hair becomes thinner, and try a lighter color, which can make thinning less obvious. Whether you have your hair washed at home or at a salon, use deep conditioning treatments regularly to combat dryness.
4. Frame your face.
Keeping your eyebrows well-groomed and shaped helps provide a frame for your face and draws attention to your eyes.
5. Cleanse and moisturize your skin.
Cleaning and moisturizing helps protect skin and keep it healthy; but banish regular soap, which can be drying for older skin. Instead, use a cleanser that gently washes without stripping skin of moisture. Avoid skin toners, especially those with a stringent or alcohol base. Use a good moisturizer day and night.
6. Dress sharp.
If you have a wrinkly neck or jowls, avoid tight-fitting or crew-neck tops, which squeeze skin upward. A shirt collar over a round-necked jersey is a better option. Wear dark-colored shirts if you have a large belly.
7. Give yourself a hand—or two.
Use a good hand cream frequently, and look for one that has sunscreen included. Brighten dull hands by exfoliating regularly: mix sea salt with lemon juice and gently scrub into your hands with a soft toothbrush.
8. Eat more greens and reds.
Vitamin K—in kale and other green vegetables—helps your blood coagulate, reducing the impact of bruising. Lycopene in tomatoes gives the skin powerful protection against UV rays.
9. Eat oily fish.
Salmon and other oily fish are rich in DMAE (dimethylaminoethanol), a compound that boosts muscle tone and is one of the must-have ingredients in expensive “mature” skin creams. Eating oily fish twice a week offers the same benefits.
10. Exercise four or more times a week.
You’ll fend off muscle loss and sleep better when you exercise most days of the week. Combine cardiovascular exercise for heart and lungs, resistance exercise for muscles, stretching for flexibility and balance exercise for coordination.

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8 Foods That Help Lower High Blood Pressure

Consuming less sodium may be important to help slash blood pressure levels, but eating more of these foods is good for your heart and arteries too. Reader’s Digest published an article about some of the foods that can lower your blood pressure. Here are some of those:
1. Baked Potato
These tasty spuds are rich in magnesium and potassium, two nutrients that are an important part of the DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, or high blood pressure). A potassium-rich diet helps the body become more efficient at flushing out excess sodium, which can raise blood pressure; and magnesium helps promote healthy blood flow, according to nutritionist Joy Bauer.
2. Skim Milk
A cold glass of milk offers a solid serving of both calcium and vitamin D, nutrients that work as a team to help lower blood pressure by 3 to 10 percent, according to Bauer’s website. Those numbers may not sound impressive, but they could translate to a 15 percent reduction in heart disease risk, she added. Other research suggests that people with low levels of calcium are at greater risk of high blood pressure.
3. Eggs
If you think eggs are not heart healthy, you should know that past studies have shown that yolks don’t raise heart disease risk; now recent research has found that egg whites can help dial down blood pressure, according to a study presented earlier this year at a meeting of the American Chemical Society. As MensHealth.com reported, when rats with high blood pressure were fed a protein found in egg whites, they experienced a drop in blood pressure that was comparable to a low dose of Captopril, a blood-pressure-lowering medication. Although more research is needed, eggs are a solid source of protein, vitamin D, and other healthy nutrients.
4. Broccoli
This cruciferous veggie is a good source of the blood pressure-regulating minerals magnesium, calcium, and potassium. Previous research in animals has found that a diet high in broccoli sprouts may help reduce blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and stroke. Broccoli sprouts are high in compounds that may help reduce damage to arteries, which may play a role in high blood pressure.
5. Beet Juice
People with high blood pressure who drank about eight ounces of beetroot juice experienced a decrease in blood pressure of about 10 mm Hg, according to a study published in April 2013 in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension. The magic ingredient? Nitrate, which turns into nitric oxide, a gas that widens blood vessels and aids blood flow. A glass a day could help keep blood pressure at a lower, healthier level.
6. Sesame and rice-bran oils
People who cooked with a blend of the two oils (available at health food stores) saw a drop in blood pressure almost comparable with the decrease that results from taking medication, according to research from the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions. Researchers believe the effect is due to the oils’ fatty acids and antioxidants such as sesamin, sesamol, sesamolin, and oryzanol.
7. Bananas
Famously rich in blood pressure-lowering potassium, one banana contains about 420 milligrams, or 11 percent of the 4,700 milligrams the American Heart Association recommends people consume daily. Surprisingly, however, many veggies are actually higher in potassium than these popular fruits. A cup of Swiss chard boasts 960 milligrams, a cup of cooked white beans has nearly 1,200 milligrams, and a whole avocado has 975 milligrams.
8. Dark chocolate
A tasty way to be heart healthy! Dark chocolate is rich in antioxidants called flavanols, which make blood vessels more elastic, according to Prevention.com. Stick to an ounce or less a day and make sure it contains at least 70 percent cocoa.